Día de los Muertos y Dia de Todos Los Santos


This will be my first year experiencing Day of the Dead, All Soul’s Day/All Saints Day in Spain. Funnily enough I haven’t spoken to any of my friends here about what is usually done to celebrate in Madrid. So consequently I have done some research, and this is what I have come with.

Oh, an interesting note to add before hand; Día de los Muertos has an uncanny resemblance to original Celtic celebrations, which were also celebrated on November 1st. The Celtic peoples honoured their dead; believing that November 1st was a day of transition between the old and the new. The people made offerings to their dead of fruit and vegetables; as those who had died (the spirits) would travel to the land of the dead together.

Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) it is traditionally a Mexican holiday on November 1st; family and friends come together to pray for, and remember friends and family members who have died.

Traditions connected with this holiday include building private altars to honour the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, along with favourite foods and beverages of the departed. Visiting graves with these as gifts is part of the celebration too. They also leave possessions of the deceased at the grave.

This holiday has its origins dating back hundreds of years; Aztec festivals for the Goddess Mictecacihuatl were the inspiration.

Day of the Dead has connection with the Catholic holidays of All Soul’s Day on November 2nd.

In Spain Dia de Todos Los Santos (All Saint’s Day) is celebrated on November 1st. In Madrid the 1st has been declared as a holiday, and most businesses will be closed.

Ofrendas (offerings) are made on this day to the dead. Friends and families visit the graves of their loved ones; to pray for them, leave candles and flowers. People will travel back to their home-towns, and villages to offer their respects also.

Presents are often given to children too; usually sweets and toys (similar to Halloween).

Streets are congested with cars heading to the cemeteries, out of the city. Florists sell more flower arrangements than at any other time of the year. Bakeries produce special orders of specific pastries like Hueso de Santos (Saint Bones). This pastry is traditional and made of marzipan, egg and sugar syrup.

People in Spain are frequently named after a saint. As is the case in many other Catholic countries; consequently people have their birthday, as well as their saint day, in honour of the saint they were named after.

Another little fact to add is that the play ‘Don Juan Tenorio’ is also traditionally performed during this time in Spain. In fact, once a year for over a century this tradition had taken place!

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© Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Cold Comfort – Welsh Ghostly Tales


It is Halloween tomorrow, and as a confirmed paranormal and supernatural fanatic I absolutely revel in all things strange and spooky! As it is a time to traditionally fear the undead that cannot rest easy in their graves; I want to relate some spooky tales to celebrate the occasion.

I am Welsh born and bred, so I thought what better tales to tell than some original Welsh ghost stories and legends.

I have selected only a handful of spooky tales, as there are just too many to note here! However, these stories hold special significance to me as they are my personal favourites; some of which I was told as a child. I have even visited some of these haunted locations myself, and can say they are quite unnerving places!

Legends:

Canwyll Corph (Corpse Candle)
Tradition dictates this was a pale light moving slowly above the ground, following a route from the house of a dying person to the Churchyard. Sometimes it was supposed to be possible to discover who would die, as the intended victim would appear as an ethereal form within the flame.

Other indications of the victim came in the form of the strength of the flame and its colour. If the flame glowed red it indicated the death of a man; a white glow indicated the death of a woman and a faint light indicated a child.

If two corpse candles were seen at the same time this was taken to indicate that two deaths would occur in the same household, at about the same time. If the corpse candle was seen early in the evening this indicated that the death would take place within a few days.

Gwyllgi (Dog of Darkness)
These terrifying apparitions took the form of a huge hound with a heavy fur coat and great glowing eyes.

The favourite ‘haunt’ of Gwyllgi were lonely Welsh country roads, of course at night-time.

These dog spectres were believed to be the devil himself chasing down his victims.

These ‘Devil Dog’ stories have been documented in many villages across Wales. In fact some lonely Welsh lanes are actually named after these legends; ‘Lon Bwbach Ddu’ (Lane of the Black Spectre) is one located outside a village called Marchwiel, North Wales.

The Devil Dog

Pwll-yr-Wrach (The Witch’s Pool)
Located on Flint Mountain, North Wales.

Legend has it that wraith like beings live under the waters of this pool, and wait patiently for their next unsuspecting victim.

In years gone by there have been many mysterious deaths associated with this particular area, most notably many drownings. There have been many strange appearances of ghostly apparitions documented too. Seemingly the spectres just appear from nowhere, and beckon people over to them as though they are lost and require help. Of course by going to help them, you in turn seal your own fate!

Beckoned to your death……

Devil’s Bridge
There are many local Welsh tales relating to ‘Devil Bridges’. In fact there is one such tale about a bridge near to where I used to live, but the story that follows is one of the oldest of such tales based high up in the hills of Aberystwyth, North Wales.

An elderly woman struck up a concord with the Devil himself one winter’s eve. Distressed that she had lost her cattle, which were stranded across a gorge, the Devil appeared to her and offered a solution.

The Devil said she should return the next morning, the bridge would be built, and he would then claim the first living thing to cross it. The woman agreed, and returning the next morning with her faithful dog as companion she couldn’t believe what she saw, a bridge.

The Devil eager to claim his own prize waited, but the old woman was wilier than he reckoned on. Throwing some food across the bridge her dog ran to retrieve it, the Devil then had his wish; but instead of the woman’s soul he had to make do with the dogs.

Haunted Inns:

The Skirrid Mountain Inn, Llanfihangel
The Inn also acted as the local Courthouse.

First entry relating to this place was in 1110 when a thief was hung for his crime inside the Inn.

In the next 800 years that followed a further 182 criminals met the same fate there.

Now it is the scene of many a paranormal investigations, it is supposedly extremely haunted. Visitors have reported feeling a noose being placed around their necks; the invisible rope actually leaves its mark around the new victim’s neck!

Haunted Graveyards:

St Mary’s Church, Minera.
This church was rebuilt as it stands today in 1865, but a place of worship existed on the site from 1577.

Supposedly this site is synonymous with black magic rituals and witchcraft; apparently a witch is buried within the grounds. There has also been reporting’s of people hearing a phantom train pass the churchyard; once the steam train ran adjacent to it. Local people have also seen ghastly apparitions dancing amongst the graves at dusk.

Manor Houses:

Plas Cadwgan Hall, North Wales
Built during the 16th Century by Welsh gentry.

This location had history of intrigue and violence from the first.

The area the Hall was eventually built on runs close to an old Roman burial site, and is located near the 8th century Offa’s Dyke, which is a site where many battles took place between the Welsh and the English. The site is also part of the old motte and bailey castle placed there as an English system of defence.

Once the actual Hall was built, the original inhabitants were part of the plot to place Mary Queen of Scots on the throne of England. The subsequent owners of the Hall were then involved in The English Civil War (actual tunnels were carved out underneath the property running underground as escape routes). There were many murders and suspicious deaths from the first.

Consequently this Hall was notorious for being haunted. Unseen coach and horses would enter the courtyard, people would run into the Hall in haste but there was no one to be seen, people could be heard walking and talking in the rooms, cries would be heard in the night; so on and so on.

This Hall no longer exists as it was demolished in the 1960’s; however a farm house now occupies the location. All that remains of the original Hall are the outbuildings, and even in modern times there have been deaths upon the site. In the late 1980’s a group of young boys were killed in one of the outbuildings in a freak accident.

Cadwgan Hall before being demolished in the 1960’s

Baron Hall, Beaumaris
Derelict and deserted, situated amid countryside. This house has a history of vampirism.

Apparently one of the young daughters from the ancestral Bulkeley family met a sinister death, and her spectre still roams the grounds.

The spectre is supposed to be a terrifying sight to behold, actually capable of scaring the observer to death. So much so that the area around is still unoccupied, and even to this day no one ventures near there at night.

Within the grounds there is the tomb, where the daughter’s body was interred; even today it is guarded with a sturdy door, bared, locked and bolted. The ruins of the house have been vandalised, but this tomb remains strangely untouched. Why?!

Baron Hall

Rofft Hall, North Wales.
Margaret Blackbourne of Rofft Hall was said to have been murdered in 1713 by her husband. She is often now referred to as “Lady Blackbird”.

The woman’s spirit was said to have been restless, the people believed she had become a vampire. This uneasy spectre was said to haunt the village of Marford, rapping upon the windows of the houses, begging to be let in.

Interestingly, the windows of the houses in the village dating back to this time, were all constructed with inbuilt crosses specifically designed to ward off Margaret’s uneasy ghost.

The spirit of the troubled Margaret – vampire perhaps?

Candelson Castle
Central to a lost village called Treganlaw (the town of a hundred hands).

Not much is know about what happened to the inhabitants of Treganlaw, although it is claimed that the village was buried under the sand dunes of Merthyr Mawr.

It is said that the castle and surrounding areas are haunted. Many old artefacts have been mysteriously found near the castle, and ghostly appearances are said to be frequent.

One of these artefacts is called the ‘Goblin Stone’. It is said that this object is haunted by a ghost that entices people to embrace it, thus entrapping them for all eternity.

Plas Teg, North Wales
A Jacobean Manor House, built by Sir John Trevor, a descendant of ancient Welsh gentry. He was Secretary to the powerful Lord Howard of Effingham at the court of the ageing Queen Elizabeth.

The house and the grounds have seen plenty of drama and violence. Not surprising that over the years tales of ghostly activities have been reported.

Paranormal investigations take place here regularly, and I have visited this house myself on many occasions. I can therefore say from personal experience, it does have an unnerving atmosphere.

Plas Teg ghosts include a drowned woman, a heart broken youth, a murdered wife, a vengeful husband, and the victims of hangings from the end of Judge Jeffries noose; even the oak staircase has a story. It is supposed to have been constructed from the timber remains of a ship from the Spanish Armada.

Plas Teg hall

The ‘Red House’, Denbigh Moors, North Wales
The ruin of a former hunting lodge, known as Gwylfa Hiraethog, situated close to a lonely pub called ‘The Sportsman’s Arms’.

Apparently ghostly spectres are seen wandering the ruins. Dark hooded figures with skull faces have been reported. People venturing there to look at the ruins have also reported feelings of hopelessness, suffocation, extreme panic and terror.

The Red House

Haunted Asylums:

Denbigh Asylum, North Wales
This building was built in 1848 with room for over 1,500 patients and 1,000 staff and it closed in 1995.

Supposed to highly haunted, and many paranormal investigations take place here.

The usual disquieting tales of spirits are reported.; crying, screaming, falling objects, rapping, banging, throwing of debris and so on and so on.

Denbigh Asylum

Wishing everyone a………

Copy Right Notice:
© Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Me, Myself and I Concur


I forgot about this post, but thanks to robertmgoldstein.com reminding me of my words, I remembered it and thought I’d
re-publish………..

I speak, you speak, they speak, we all speak; but do we even care what is being said?

Opinions; seem to be integrated into us, derived from who we are and what we know. Yet, they are subject to change. Opinions differ from person to person, context, situation and time. They can be fleeting or concrete. Yet what influences them to change? Is it because we are malleable and easily swayed when we come under pressure from others?

Do we willingly abandon our opinions when challenged? Should we?

As bloggers we all have plenty to say. I know I can’t get enough of opinions; mine and other peoples! I thoroughly enjoy writing opinions and reading them; new ideas, experiences and knowledge hold a wealth of inspiration for me. I actively seek out new blogs just to read what has been posted; I think I am addicted to the written word! I know I WOULDN’T want anyone to tame their opinion or tailor their words to please me. Yet, some people might not feel the same. Some people might only appreciate opinions that concur with their own.

So, what do we look for or find in other peoples words to make us think; ‘Hey I like what that person has to say’?

I know when I see something that strikes a chord within me; it makes me want to respond or react. It could be anything at anytime. Yet, is there a specific element that qualifies one opinion to hold more credence or appeal than another? Is there an essential mix that creates a good opinion? Can we ever all fully agree on one thing?

Is a good opinion one that matches with our own personal belief systems and affiliations? What encourages us to agree with another person; is it something we do because we feel in awe of that person? Perhaps, we want to reciprocate something they have done for us, so we agree with them? Or do we want to pay homage merely to feather our own nests?

Are some opinions more important to us than others?

Opinions are part of our ‘mundane’ every life. I mean, everyone has an opinion on something; what they prefer for breakfast and why, what country they like to visit for holidays and why, what political party they choose to follow and why. Yet, opinions are powerful if directed correctly; they change the way we perceive things and the world around us. Isn’t it therefore a privilege to be able to know what other people think or believe, even if we don’t concur?

Or, maybe every topic of conversation has already been covered so thoroughly, that now we are just reinventing the wheel by discussing the same things? Are opinions boring? I don’t think they are, but then that is my opinion!

It is highly therapeutic for me to share my words, and other peoples! Discussing and debating is part and parcel to my life, without these things it would be a dull existence. I urge people to speak their minds, and I listen carefully to what is being said even if I don’t agree. Likewise, I read carefully what is written.

Do we all truly hear the words being spoken or read the words written? Or do we switch off if the message conflicts with what we want to see and hear? Do we see and hear merely what we want to? Do we then misconstrue the message? Do we ever listen to others opinions and words; or are we all just waiting for our turn to speak?

Putting it simply; do we really care what others have to say or write?

I KNOW I CARE!! I hope I am not alone?!

Maybe you might think there are too many opinions, so many that they get lost in the background? Or is there not enough? What is missing in the grand world of opinions that needs to be said?

Any ideas to share???

 

The Opiate For The People – Capitalism and Its Control


One side of the Capitalist coin

Capitalism; our friend or foe? Its glory shines brightly, but not everyone basks in its radiance.

The reality behind the veil; in other words the myth Capitalism perpetuates to ensure us ordinary folk are kept in place, and toe the line.

The more we want the less we get, but the harder we’ll try regardless; determined to be what Capitalism says we can be – successful and rich.

After all, the free market is where competition is encouraged; anyone can be anything so long as they work hard for it. ‘The opiate for the people’, yes it is, that and popular culture.

With everyone striving to have 3D televisions and the next new BMW, no one is going to challenge the system or rock the boat.

If we all buy in to the ‘dream’ we are less of a threat, subdued and controlled.

Greed, and self deception = capitalisms best friend.

The other side of the Capitalist coin

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© Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A Dedicated Follower of Fashion – Beau Brummell and the History of the Quintessential Man’s Suit.


The British Regency period (1811-1820: when The Prince of Wales became Prince Regent), has been described as the most explosive and creative.

Akin to the 1960’s; enormous changes in culture and society all fused together in one enormous burst of energy.

The battle of Waterloo was won. London was completely re-designed. Turner and Constable were painting, the waltz was introduced (highly risky dance for that era), and Jane Austen and Lord Byron were inspired by the life surrounding them to write.

The glamour, the tastes, scandal and gossip, opulent aristocrats, blossoming middle classes, monarchs, decadence, the celebrity culture, the drugs and drink (minus the rock and roll); it was a celebration of youth culture and of course the fashions. The Regency era was an age of exuberance and creativity, but also of excess and deprivation.

The Dandy – Dress Etiquette and Suit Style

Amid all of this was there was rise of the ‘Dandy’, a fashion etiquette and new wave of style.

How is this important? Well, the ‘Dandy’ shunned traditional elaborate aristocratic styles of the time; wigs, breeches and powder were replaced by simplistic elegance. In short, this was when the plain black suit and ‘tie’ became the epitome of the male wardrobe; embracing masculinity and not femininity.

The person responsible for introducing and establishing this modern men’s suit, and fashion necessity was the infamous George Bryan “Beau” Brummell (7 June 1778 – 30 March 1840).

Beau Brummell became an iconic figure in Regency Britain. The arbiter of men’s fashion, and also a friend of the Prince Regent, the future King George IV; this friendship enabled Beau to entrench what might have been dismissed as an insignificant, and fleeting fashion faux pas into mainstream culture. Beau’s ideas were propelled; taking root in society, they had substantial influence.

Brummell was responsible for making a generation rethink their style choices, and ingrained a fresh sense of what fashion was. Men had never before embraced the understated. Perfectly tailored dark coats, polished boots (with Champagne of course), and full-length trousers rather than knee breeches and stockings, and above all immaculate shirt linen with an elaborately knotted cravat; a must of the ‘Dandy’.

The Beau Brummell ‘Dandy’

Beau’s personal habits were as fastidious as his fashion choices. Attention to detail was a prerequisite for any ‘Dandy’, and it was claimed he took five hours a day to dress. Cleaning his teeth, shaving, and daily bathing were part and parcel of achieving the style, just as much as the clothes.

Brummell’s dictum eventually exerted an influence upon the ‘ton’. The ‘ton’ a term used in reference to Britain’s higher echelons of polite society during the Regency era. The word is derived from the French word meaning ‘taste’ or ‘everything that is fashionable’. The full phrase is ‘le bon ton’, meaning good manners or ‘in the fashionable mode’; the characteristics which epitomised the ideals held onto by the British ‘ton’.

Once the ‘ton’ had adopted the style it then became the must for every self respecting fashion conscious man. Brummell’s niche fashion etiquette then became global; making an impression on all fashion from that day to this.

Bronze Statue of Beau Brummell in Jermyn Street, London

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© Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

You Can’t Handle The Truth!


Laying it all bare, for the world to see, dropping the pretence, the charade?

I agree with being honest. Just being free enough to say this is me, this is it, these are my feelings and so on; but most people don’t want honesty. In fact studies show we don’t even want honesty ourselves; our own unconscious brain dictates that. Under tests participants have proven to blatantly ignore truthful facts if they are detrimental to them as humans. It seems lies are a human fundamental, a defence mechanism; part of something ancient that remains within us all.

So basically, when we are faced with the harsh truth, our minds deny it so we as a species can carry on living. Maybe without those lies we tell ourselves daily we’d never get up in the mornings?!

If we saw the real truth all the time we might decide to merely curl up and die, because the truth often is grimmer than the reality we think we know and see around us.

Lets face it the truth can be detrimental, examples; chances of getting cancer in your lifetime, chances of dying of a heart attack, likelihood of divorce, chances of being cheated on, murder, becoming homeless, being bankrupt, unemployed or never fulfilling a life’s dream. In short it takes away hope, and no one wants to admit that whatever they are doing could cause themselves harm in the long run.

Truth when applied to some situations merely deprives us of the remotest possibility that everything will be OK. Regardless of the adversity and the odds that are against us, we all hope everything will be OK in the end.

As people we are therefore used to being tricksters, excellent at concealing the truth even within ourselves. We have our reasons no doubt, does it always have to be because we have a hidden agenda or can’t face up to reality? Aren’t some things best left to the imagination or indeed left unsaid?

If we could always see and hear the truth would we choose to? Could everyone cope with seeing behind the veil of everyone’s reality or the world’s for that matter; no I don’t think we all could. I understand there are some things that need to be revealed as truth, but it is doubtful that everything truthful would be received as a ‘blessing’, because people are used to a life in the dark; and there are some truths that might be out of our comprehension.

Maybe then living a half lie is OK?

Perhaps so, as not every lie is meant to be harmful.

We as people should be able to choose what part of life we want to see as a harsh reality, and that which we choose not to; and what pieces of our own psyche we conceal and that which we don’t (it is our prerogatives as humans). After all no one knows anyone or anything 100%; we and everything around us are based on opinions (how we perceive ourselves, others and the world). Who’s truth is correct? Some people don’t even know themselves 100%; so how can they fathom out any lies inside themselves, how can they know what they are seeing in the world is a lie or the truth?

What is the truth anyway? Isn’t it relative to the situation, person, place, time and so on? Perhaps one person’s lie is merely another persons truth?

What do you think? Please leave me some food for thought!!!!

Copy Right Notice:
© Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Brain Plasticity – How Do We Learn?


Brain Plasticity – looks as complex as it sounds?

Well, last week I had my first official Intercambio meeting (Spanish and English language exchange), via a college here in Madrid. I have written about learning Spanish in a previous post, and the trials and tribulations of becoming accustomed to a new language and life setting. It is not as though I don’t use what Spanish I have learnt, or practice with others, but this Intercambio meeting was the first step in officially ratifying and testing my learning.

Needless to say I felt very nervous. One reason was the fact I didn’t know who I would be meeting with, and I couldn’t be certain whether we would have any common ground to even begin a conversation with. Secondly I really pinned my hopes on using this meeting as a vehicle to gain acquaintance with new people, and to continue to expand my networks; hence I really wanted the initial meeting to go well. Thirdly I was aware I was succumbing to my inner disappointments, because of my lack of Spanish language skills. I therefore felt I was going to be somehow inferior to everyone else present. I have this belief that everyone I meet has mastered a second or third language far better than I ever will; not a conducive thought for the learning processes to take hold (I know).

Anyway, I was eagerly punctual, as always and begun chatting to one of the staff at the college who is Romanian. He was trying to reassure me that it does take time to learn any language well enough to speak confidently, while proceeding to provide me with the same advice I usually receive; go out more and interact and listen to the language being spoken, watch television and listen to the radio. Basically submerse myself in the language on a daily basis.

Of course I agree with this, but again I seem to struggle, though admittedly I am not submerging myself enough.

However, I have reached a point where I am considering my brain’s capacity to actually learn a new language. Is it physically possible for me to learn a new language, have I the specific abilities required in this type of learning or is it merely my self doubt hindering my abilities because I insist on being under confident?

Learning is a complex, but it often happens without conscious recognition; it is something we do everyday without thought. I wondered how it was possible to even begin learning anything, how is learning made easy or completed by the brain. Well, after studying Psychology I know the scientific facts of how the brain absorbs and retains information; written, spoken, memories and actions. I have learnt about Neurons, Neural pathways and Synapses. Yet, how does what we learn, see or do actual stick; what acts do we complete whilst learning something to make the physical processes in the brain kick in?

I considered the theory of ‘brain plasticity’, I wondered if it were applicable. Put simply this theory states; plasticity is something that occurs when we engage in new learning and experience, the brain begins to establish neural pathways to compensate. Neural pathways or circuits are routes made of inter-communicating neurons. These routes are created in the brain through learning and practice; like retreading a path. Visual and auditory cortex’s can be involved in the process, as well as muscle memory. The more you revisit the new experience or learning activity, the stronger the connections become, the more efficient they are made and the faster cognition will become.

Sounds simple enough right?! Well, I now have begun to wonder if my brain has lost out on this plasticity malarkey. Just how much brain plasticity I have in reference to being able to learn new language skills?

Now I haven’t completed a scientific test, but surely not all people are able to learn and perfect everything? The scientific theory seems to make it all sound so easy; the old adage of practice makes perfect resonates throughout it. Yet, what if the practice itself is difficult? What if you prefer something more than the other, won’t that effect what and how you learn? How is it that I can read or watch something I find interesting in English, and retain the information immediately, and in Spanish I feel as though my brain resists the information and learning process?

Are some areas of learning or things to be learnt, just out of bounds for some people? I mean not everyone can dance, play guitar, recall their maths times tables; so cannot that be true of language?

I feel there is always a piece of the learning process missing when it comes to practising Spanish. I know practice and effort are the key, but also self belief, confidence and understanding what we are learning have importance too. Maybe they hold more importance than the actual effort and practice. From experience repetition and effort doesn’t always succeed in making learning kick in and stick. Or could it be that once you get past your teens learning becomes more difficult; because finding the time and head space to fully dedicate yourself, and concentrate completely on learning something new becomes more scarce?

Anyway, I intend to put the theories to the test, on myself in any-case. I have the opportunity to do so as the Intercambio meeting went well, and I will be meeting with a couple of people on a regular basis to practice Spanish. Hopefully I can then shock my brain into action or reaction! I don’t really want to seriously consider the fact that my brain might not have the capacity to learn a new language; that thought doesn’t appeal to me. I feel there has to be a way! I will therefore use all the learning techniques available to encourage plasticity. After all, I am Mistress over my own brain, or am I?

Copy Right Notice:
© Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Bex Houghagen and The Savvy Senorita with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.